The sheer quality of the game?

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(Pocket-lint) The Spatha X is an absolute beast of a gaming mouse that flips 12 programmable buttons, advanced RGB lighting, a convenient charging dock, and much more.

This is a great gaming mouse with some interesting design aspects that may make it attractive to gamers with large hands and palms. This is how we got away with it.

Giant good?

  • 12 programmable buttons
  • 2.4GHz wired or wireless mode
  • Dimensions: 89 x 137 x 45 mm / Weight: 168g
  • 19,000 DPI, 400 IPS, 50G acceleration, 1000Hz polling rate

When we first got our hands on the ROG Spatha X, we were instantly shocked by the size of this thing. Where other mice are getting small and light, Asus has gone completely in the opposite direction here.

The Spatha X weighs 168 grams, nearly three times the weight of some of the lighter mice we reviewed recently. Even the Corsair M65 RGB Ultra Wireless with its aluminum frame weighs just 110g. So Spatha X has already set the tone for doing things differently.

Then there is the form and composition. The frame of this mouse is huge, and we were honestly pleased to see that we generally play in fist style and don’t like our hand touching the mouse pad. If you’re of the same opinion as well, you’ll be glad to see that the Spatha X has finger and thumb rests on either side of its frame, so it’s easy to keep your fingers away while you play.

Although thumb rests are common, it is unusual to see a spot with your other fingers on the right side of the mouse. The original design here also means that you can apparently hold it in two different ways: either with your ring finger on the raised area to the right and with your little finger on the rubber handle on the raised side; Or with all fingers on top, having to use your middle finger on the mouse wheel (which seems to be an intention of this design).

Next to the left mouse button are two small buttons for easy access – assuming you can get used to them. By default, these buttons are configured to be “Back” and “Forward”. These actions are usually attributed to the thumb buttons of most other gaming mice. This is another proof of how the Spatha X really holds up.

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On the left side of the mouse, where your thumb is, there are no less than six programmable buttons. We think they’re oddly designed, as they come in a variety of shapes and sizes. This is again by design as it was designed to resemble the iconic ‘ROG Eye’. This area is well accentuated by the RGB ambient lighting and there’s no denying that it’s definitely stunning.

Asus says that “…the placement of each button has been carefully considered for a fit, and they are all designed to provide a click-touch feel for easy and responsive control.” We’re not sure if we agree with that, unfortunately. Our experience with these buttons was clouded by the closeness with which they were assembled. It is not easy to differentiate them on the basis of touch alone. Except for the first one at the bottom and the first two, it’s hard to tell which one is so, so don’t assume that you’ll be able to schedule all the important actions and then succeed in the game’s moves.

By default, these ROG-aligned buttons are also set to some weird controls, including muting and opening the Windows menu. So if you mainly use ROG Spatha X for gaming, that’s the point, right? – You will then have to reprogram it in Armory Crate or disassemble it (as we did when your game is minimized or the sound drops off when you are in the middle of a game).

We generally like multi-button mice because this design offers a lot of flexibility in terms of adding controls, customizing the setting, and accessing more buttons when playing different games. The experience is definitely one that you need to take some time to get used to – but we believe that after enough use you can get used to it.

Plus, there’s a lot to like about the whole thing. Even switching DPI – where you adjust the sensitivity of the dots per inch for different tasks – can be operated via the button behind the mouse wheel or with the wheel itself. It is also unusual.

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super charger

  • magnetic charging station
  • Battery life 67 hours

One of the most important features of the Spatha X is certainly the included charging station. This not only serves as a place to put the mouse when not in use, but also as a signal transmitter. This means that you can easily get a good signal out of it when playing on a 2.4GHz wireless network and have no latency issues.

Most importantly, this dock handles the load. It’s magnetic and only requires you to hold the mouse a short distance before you suck it into place.

When you’re done playing, you can enter it to make sure it’s fully charged next time. The Spatha X has 67 hours of battery life with RGB lighting, but we found that with the charging station, we never had to plug it in and use it wired. If it does need a charge, you’ll also be happy to read that there’s fast charging technology, so a 15-minute docking or calling station can give you an extra 12 hours of playback. There is an LED indicator on the dock that also lets you know how much the mouse is charged.

There are two USB-C cables included in the box, so you can leave the docking station plugged in and keep another cable free to plug in if you feel the need. It’s these little touches that make the Spatha X so attractive.

interchangeable keys

  • ROG Micro Switch with a lifespan of up to 70 million clicks
  • Hot-swappable push-button switch design (three-pin)
  • rotary button design

The Spatha X is built with a user-swappable switch design, as are other Asus ROG mice – for example, Gladius III Wireless. ROG Precision Switches are used as standard and come with an extra pair in the box. These are high quality mouse switches that are built to last and give you a responsive and accurate gaming experience. But if it wears out over time, you have the option to replace it.

Asus made this remarkably easy. Under the mouse there are four rubber stoppers. Remove it and you can use the included tool to unwrap the frame and remove the top of the mouse. From there you can access not only the battery (for future replacement) but also the switches. They are seamless and feature a compression fit design so you can take them out and wear new ones.

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This is great because it contributes to the durability of this mouse. If you start experiencing double-click or other wear issues, you can easily change it yourself. There is also the option to simply purchase your own switches to try out a different click configuration. We had Huano’s white dot switches on hand and they fit just as well. As long as the switches are three-pin, it’s an easy switch.

First impressions

There’s no denying that ROG Spatha X is a gaming mouse that stands out from the crowd with its funky, massive, button-type design.

It takes some getting used to, but we think if you want to play with a bigger mouse and don’t mind the extra weight, you’ll totally appreciate this.

The easy-to-use charging dock is also a huge bonus in our minds, so overall it’s a good mouse – but a little too heavy for our personal preferences.

also considered

Rhythm Pocket Lint CMSOthers to look at the picture 1

Corsair M65 RGB Ultra Wireless

A bit smaller than the Spatha X and has fewer buttons, it’s also lighter and nicely capable. If you want a heavy mouse, but no too much Heavy duty is a great alternative.

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lint pocketOthers to look at the photo 2

Asus ROG Sword III sans file

If the Spatha X is attractive with its push-button design, the Gladius III is also worth a look. This mouse may be more attractive because it is lighter in weight and has the ability to work with three or five small keys, which makes it more flexible. In addition, an additional advantage is the optical switches for additional accuracy.

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Written by Adrian Wellings. Originally Posted in .

Samantha Arnold

<p class="sign">"Web fanatic. Travel scholar. Certified music evangelist. Coffee expert. Unapologetic internet guru. Beer nerd."</p>

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