Virtual reality, an effective crutch

HIn fifteen minutes, Annick Munzi played the drums, shot lasers at asteroids, and painted vases with her feet. This woman from Bergeraques is hospitalized part-time in Passy CastleAnd in Saint-Medard-de-Musidane (Dordogne). After undergoing knee surgery and a fall, she is undergoing rehabilitation at the Center for Medical Care and Rehabilitation (CSMR).

Among the exercises given to her to get back on her feet, some require her to wear a virtual reality headset. Equipped with arms…

HIn fifteen minutes, Annick Munzi played the drums, shot lasers at asteroids, and painted vases with her feet. This woman from Bergeraques is hospitalized part-time in Passy CastleAnd in Saint-Medard-de-Musidane (Dordogne). After undergoing knee surgery and a fall, she is undergoing rehabilitation at the Center for Medical Care and Rehabilitation (CSMR).

Among the exercises given to her to get back on her feet, some require her to wear a virtual reality headset. Equipped with controllers and equipped with sensors, she puts her aching limbs to work almost without her noticing. By playing drums or shooting asteroids. “I'm busy with the procedures to be done, and I don't feel the pain,” smiles Annick Munzi, who is participating in her 32nd session of this therapeutic video game, offered at the Château de Bassy since February 2023.

Passy Castle will celebrate its centenary in 2025.

Stefan Klein/SO

Marc Bono is an adapted physical activity teacher. He was the one who piloted Anik's virtual reality headset that day. “The brain tells us we can't lift our arm or leg, and sight hinders our movement,” he explains. Thanks to full immersion in virtual reality, these brakes are removed. » Patients achieve what they never thought they could achieve. “Sometimes, we have to film them so that they believe it,” adds the hygienist, who ensures that the rehabilitation process, which also includes classical exercises, is accelerated.

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The machine records and analyzes the slightest movement, allowing caregivers to evaluate progress and adapt each session, or even adjust the program in real time. 130 different exercises are offered, which can be done while sitting or standing.

“This equipment is aimed at people who have had surgery on their upper and lower limbs, and those who have had a stroke, suffer from Parkinson's disease or have fallen,” explains Charlotte Jeannot, new director of the CSMR Center at Château de Bassy. This is without specifying age. “The oldest patient he used was 96 years old.”

Charlotte Jeannot assumed her duties as director of the Château de Bassy on May 2.
Charlotte Jeannot assumed her duties as director of the Château de Bassy on May 2.

Stefan Klein/SO

Charlotte Janot has been in office since May 2, and is happy that her foundation has made such an investment (15,000 euros), which is “rare outside major cities, and more often used for relaxation than rehabilitation.” For young women, it enhances the appeal of CSMR, “for health workers and for patients.” On Monday, June 10, she invited surgeons from hospitals and clinics who refer patients to her (Libourne, Bergerac, Périgaux) to also come and shoot asteroids or draw with their feet. To convince them of the benefit of virtual reality for their patients.

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Frank Mccarthy

<p class="sign">"Certified gamer. Problem solver. Internet enthusiast. Twitter scholar. Infuriatingly humble alcohol geek. Tv guru."</p>

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